Scientific Mythologies
by James A. Herrick
Length: 288 pages
Publisher: IVP Academic (June 2, 2008)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0830825886

Noticed how science fact is looking and sounding more like science “fiction”? Why? Could it be part conditioning through movies, comics, TV shows, and novels? Is it part necessity as the data outstrips our abilities to explain and handle it?

As a science fiction fan and a Christian, I found the book extremely interesting. The author, James Herrick, delves into an obsessive amount of detail and shows that there’s a lot of science fiction that involves religious concepts, most notable is “The Force” from the Star Wars series. The author then displays how that these ideas make it easier for people to accept alternative “spiritualities”. And a noteworthy feature is that from what I’ve read, the author doesn’t take a negative view of science fiction; he only discusses its influence on people in the “spiritual” baseball field.

Anyway, don’t listen to me. If you like science fiction (Who doesn’t these days?) and you enjoy the field of apologetics, get this book.

NOTE: The book has one drawback: It’s printed in a small font.


Here’s a description of this fascinating book from the publisher’s Web site itself:


“What does science have to do with science fiction? What does science fiction have to do with scientists? What does religion have to do with science and science fiction?

In the spiritual vacuum of our post-Christian West, new mythologies continually arise. The sources of much religious speculation, however, may be surprising. Author James Herrick directs our attention to a wide range of scientists, filmmakers, science fiction writers and religious philosophers and discovers there the role that science and science fiction have played in such mythmaking.

From scientists such as Francis Bacon, Francis Crick, Carl Sagan and Freeman Dyson, to filmmakers such as George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, to science fiction writers such as Olaf Stapledon, Sir Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov, Herrick finds a curious collusion of science with science fiction for promoting and justifying alternative spiritualities. The rise of these new mythologies, he argues, is no longer a curiosity at the edge of Western culture. This alchemy is catalyzing a religious vision of new gods, a new humanity, and alien races with superior intelligence and secret knowledge. This new mythology overshadows the realms of politics, science and religion.

Should we follow such visions? Does science endorse these mythologies? Are we being offered a spirituality superior to the Judeo-Christian tradition? This book will help you decide.”

Get it here: Scientific Mythologies

Or here: Scientific Mythologies

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